A must have is a must tell

Published: Sep 19 , 2013
Author: Al Green

When you “must have” a particular issue, tell people—and you’ll greatly increase your chances of getting it.

 Be specific to ensure that they understand, and do it as early as possible (e.g., opening statement) so it’s more credible and you can structure the other side’s expectations.

 I was assisting my youngest daughter, who lives in another state, purchase her first house via the phone and internet. The transaction had proceeded fairly smoothly through the contract and mortgage commitment, and closing had been scheduled several weeks out within a one-week window.

 She called me very upset. Her employer had scheduled several conferences and business trips, leaving her available for only two of the seven possible closing dates. She had informed her lender and attorney about her conflicts, but hadn’t heard back. 

 Though she thought the bank and attorney “could figure it out,” I asked her to call them and explain that closing “had” to happen on one of the two available dates. Plus, due to a few repairs that the seller had promised, she believed it was imperative for her to be there for the final inspection and closing. 

 She called me back several hours later and told me the closing had been scheduled on her first available date.

 Don’t make those on the other side guess or figure out your must-have. Tell them.

Al Green


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Al Green
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